Thursday, December 13, 2007

Vincent and other Stuff

"One may have a blazing hearth in one's soul, and yet no one ever comes to sit by it. Passersby see only a wisp of smoke rising from the chimney and continue on their way" - Vincent Van Gogh 1853 - 1890

I love this quote. I don't pretend to be an expert in Van Gogh's life and perhaps this quote had nothing to do with his life. There are only a few instances in life where we really get glimpses into others souls and I like to think that this is one of them for Vincent. He was so emotional and intense and I think so lonely. From this quote, I think that he was starving for affection and desperate to share his life with someone that could appreciate him.

As far as the "other stuff" I've just been working quite a bit on some random commissions and trying to keep up on my regular work as well. I thought that I would post a few more paintings that I've done recently or that I just wanted to make sure that I posted:
















Tuesday, October 23, 2007

the shoe show

I never did post the pix from the Shoe Show at Evergreen, so here we go:
First of all, here is the announcement:






















Wednesday, October 17, 2007

Springville and Minerva

Last night, Julia and I took Remlee down to Springville to drop off work at the Museum. I'm trying to get my work into the religious show that will be opening in a few weeks. As soon as I get the images off of my camera, i will be sure to post them. Afterwards, we were able to meet up with Gary and Judy in Provo. We went to BYU's Museum of Art to see the Minerva Teichert show. I love to see other artists work! I leave exhibits wanting to incorporate bits and pieces of their work into my own. There is something very polished about the unfinished quality to her Minerva's work. On some level it irritates me because I want the painting to be finished at the same level across the entire painting. On the other hand, it impresses me because she can just let some bit of her painting drop off because it isn't the focal point. I guess that i'm mostly impressed because it is something that i would really struggle with.

Tuesday, September 25, 2007

rem and her pink bannooo.

i thought that i would try posting a short video and picture.



Friday, September 7, 2007

testing my skills at loading pics



recent thoughts on art.

I had this idea come to me as I was looking at a drawing that I had done recently. The thing is that it really isn’t any huge break through; it was just something that I hadn’t realized. The idea is this: Drawing from the figure and drawing a figure from a photo/image aren’t the same. You cannot possibly get the same result. The live figure has a true sense of space around them that cannot be felt from a photo. Cropping and creating drawing from live space is much more intensive than using the cropping that is given in a photograph. The light changes, adjusting shadows, the model moves, altering the angle and shadow that was once true.

Following that logic, painting from a photo/in studio versus painting plein air has the same result. I have a tendency to rotate my canvas / photo to paint edges differently, to make painting certain angles easier, etc. That is not a possibility on site. It is easier to eliminate subject matter from a photo, the painting source doesn’t move with the wind or change where it is grazing. When painting plein air, you have to create the cropping that a photo normally would. Colors are easier to mix in studio under a controlled light. The controlled light makes it different. It isn’t necessarily better, just a different form of art. I don’t think that anyone would argue that some of the paintings by Warhol or Pollock are any less relevant than a painting done by Sargent or Monet. They are seeking after different results.

All of these things seem like they should be elementary in the basic concepts of art, yet I hadn’t made that connection. My point is this: on some level, painting plein air and drawing live from the model will yield a similar result. Painting and drawing from a photograph will as well. So when I as an artist feel like I love to draw from a live model yet don’t care to paint plein air, there is a certain glaring need to exercise my skills plein air. Anyway…